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Words to inspire the belief that we have all we need to be the change we wish to see.

Category: Article (Page 2 of 67)

Courage is Calling

I’m currently reading Courage is Calling by Ryan Holiday. He says it’s okay to be scared, but don’t be afraid. Too afraid to act.

He writes, “No rule is perfect, but this one works: Our fears point us, like a self-indicating arrow, in the direction of the right thing to do. One part of us knows what we ought to do, but the other part reminds us of the inevitable consequences. Fear alerts us to danger, but also to opportunity. If it wasn’t scary, everyone would do it. If it was easy, there wouldn’t be any growth in it. That tinge of self-preservation is the pinging of the metal detector going off. We may have found something. Will we ignore it? Or will we dig?” Continue reading

On a quest

My teen daughter and I were talking about mindset and perspective last weekend. She was on a quest to get a first place in her dance competitions to move up to the next level. Many times over the past ten months she got seconds and thirds and fourths and those days were celebrations. But this past weekend, when she earned a second and a fifth, she was disappointed. We discussed how mindset is everything. If you expect something and don’t receive it, it steals your joy.

We also discussed how the climb is about the little things. Continue reading

The Denial of Death

My to-read book pile is massive, and I often joke that I have no shelf control. But lifelong learning is my oxygen, so this is also a piece of self-care.

However, I was shocked to hear the name of a book recently that I had never heard of before. And because it is a Pulitzer Prize-winner about psychology, and I have an Honours Psychology degree, I was even more stunned that I wasn’t familiar with it.

Anthropologist Ernest Becker wrote The Denial of Death. As author Mark Manson writes, “it would become one of the most influential intellectual works of the twentieth century, shaking up the fields of psychology and anthropology, while making profound philosophical claims that are still influential today.” Continue reading

Self-esteem

I am usually reading a few books at once. And what seems to happen recently is that two books that I pick up share similar ideas, which in turn jumps out at me as I am seeing the same message from two different authors.

I am reading Mark Manson’s The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck where he says about the 1960s, “Many researchers and policymakers at the time came to believe that raising a population’s self-esteem could lead to some tangible social benefits: lower crime, better academic records, greater employment, lower budget deficits. As a result, beginning in the next decade, the 1970s, self-esteem practices began to be taught to parents, emphasized by therapists, politicians, and teachers, and instituted into educational policy. Grade inflation, for example, was implemented to make low-achieving kids feel better about their lack of achievement. Participation awards and bogus trophies were invented for any number of mundane and expected activities.”

Self-esteem became the answer. Continue reading

The Extraordinary Gift of Being Ordinary

I’m reading The Extraordinary Gift of Being Ordinary by Dr. Ronald D. Siegel, Assistant Professor of Psychology at Harvard Medical School. In it he writes, “Most of us feel proud of our achievements at first. When we learned to walk as toddlers, or successfully put multicoloured plastic rings on a post in size order, most of us felt pretty good about ourselvesĀ  — and enjoyed showing off to anyone willing to watch. Remember how it felt to be able to catch a ball, ride a bike, or go to the store alone? How about graduating from grade school, high school or college? Having your first girlfriend or boyfriend? Getting a job or a driver’s license? Or perhaps getting married, renting an apartment, owning a car, buying a house, or having a child? Most of us work hard for these milestones and feel buoyed up when we reach them. Continue reading

Stories

As the new year dawned, I was reminded once again of the clean slate, the blank page, and the importance of stories.

Stories help us decide where to live, what schools our children attend, what meals to make, what restaurants to try, what books to read, what countries to visit, what jobs to take, where to change our tires, cut our hair or exercise our body.

We learn through stories. We communicate with stories. We are inspired by stories.

The poet Muriel Rukeyser once said, “The universe is made of stories, not of atoms.”

Continue reading

Unprecedented

What a few years it’s been. Who knew we could use unprecedented in so many situations? I mean, how do you prepare for a once in a lifetime pandemic? For changes to everyday life that have never happened in your memory.

And yet, here we are.

As we look forward to new chapters, it’s hard not to look back. Continue reading

As I approach half a century

As I approach half a century on this magical globe rocketing through the universe I must say, it’s been quite a ride. And I am so grateful.

I always loved to write, and I have been blessed to publish a book, post a weekly blog, and work as a copywriter and communications specialist.

I always knew I wanted to be a mom and I have been gifted with three wonderful children who challenge me, inspire me, teach me, and love me. A gift that can’t be bought.

I always enjoyed travelling and I have been lucky to visit countries like Ireland, Scotland, Italy, Greece, Portugal and many parts of the United States and Canada. My passport is a prized possession because it allows me to fly, literally and figuratively.

I always adored reading and I have travelled to many places and eras through the pages of countless books. This recently led me to join an outstanding group of local women in a book club that has brought me laughs, learning and lifelong friendships. Continue reading

We need evidence

We need evidence.

Of being a good parent, friend, colleague, sister, daughter, or neighbour.

We want someone to say, “You did a good job.”

As Oprah once shared, no matter who she had on her show, from regular folks to presidents, the first thing they asked when it went to commercial break was, “How did I do?” Continue reading

The Storyteller’s Secret

I just love a good story. I’m reading The Storyteller’s Secret by Carmine Gallo and it’s chock full of golden nuggets.

Gallo writes about Danny, who never wanted to be a lawyer, yet ended up at dinner with his uncle the night before writing the law school entrance exam.

When he told his uncle his true feelings, his uncle asked why he didn’t do what he had always loved? Danny didn’t know what that was, and his uncle said that he should open a restaurant because he was always so into food.

Danny wrote the LSAT the next day but never went to law school. He left a sales job making $125,000 a year to earn $250 a week as a restaurant assistant manager and loved it. Continue reading

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