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Siobhan Kelleher Kukolic

Words to inspire the belief that we have all we need to be the change we wish to see.

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Don Quixote

I was listening to magician David Blaine on The Tim Ferriss Show this week and he shared the back story on Cervantes, the author of Don Quixote, and it was mesmerizing.

David said, “The book that blows me away beyond anything, and it’s hard to explain it, Cervantes. Yeah, that guy, he wrote Don Quixote. His life was the most, for a writer, his life is what writers dream for. Even though it was a horrific and terrible life. Cervantes was the son of a surgeon in Spain. He died in 1616, the same year as Shakespeare. But back then, you were very poor. When he was 18 or something, he joined the military to fight for his country. He got shot and was maimed on the left side, so he was paralyzed on his left arm.

But he won the equivalent of the Purple Heart, so the King gave him a letter. On their trip back home in the boat, pirates basically took them captive. He was made into a slave for five years. While they were trying to get ransom, because he had this letter from the King, so they thought he was so important and so wealthy, which he wasn’t, they would just abuse and torture him. Continue reading

Nine days

I love the arts.  I’ve been engaged with our local film festival for years.  I would buy a pass and attend the shows, while my oldest was the event photographer.  I was always inspired by watching the under-the-radar selection of movies that might not always make it to the coast-to-coast big screen.

This weekend I watched Nine Days.  Really made you think.  A character named Will was interviewing people (souls) over nine days.  Each soul was vying for the opportunity to become alive in someone’s body born on earth.  When not interviewing, Will watched the souls he had sent to earth previously on TVs showing them living all of life’s moments, big and small.  He was torn by one storyline that ended badly and then an interview candidate named Emma challenged Will to face his own demons too. Continue reading

A note to my graduates

I am a mother-of-three with two graduating this week.  One from Grade 8 and one from Grade 12.  So, I wanted to write a note to my graduates as they turn the page onto a new chapter.

You never really know how the story will unfold.  No one does.  We didn’t know we’d be living through a pandemic, yet here we are.  You don’t have to know what you want to be.  Just be curious.  Take risks.  Embrace failure as a lesson.  Get up when you fall. Continue reading

Deconstruction, selection, sequencing and stakes

I was listening to The Tim Ferriss Show and he was talking about the framework he uses to learn.

He calls it DSSS.  Deconstruction.  Selection.  Sequencing.  And stakes.

Tim didn’t learn to swim until he was in his 30s.  There was shame and embarrassment associated with it for him and none of the regular methods had worked.  Then he found a system called total immersion that talked about deconstructing swimming into parts.  Just the breathing.  And then just the kicking.  And then just the arm movements.  Within a few weeks he was swimming. Continue reading

Hope

Hope.  It is such a little word with such big consequences.  It allows us to see tomorrow as another day, another chance, another chapter, another path.

We hope that things will work out, that things will get better, that things will go back to normal.  Whatever normal ever was. Continue reading

How could that happen?

So often I hear about unfair, horrific, and heartbreaking stories around the world, and I think to myself, “How was that allowed to happen?”

I remember when the story surfaced of the remains of almost 800 children being found at the Bon Secours Mother and Baby Home in Galway, Ireland.  How could that happen?

When I read the history on what happened at Black Wall Street in Tulsa 100 years ago this week, and the countless people who were murdered and have never been accounted for.  How could that happen?

And when I heard about the remains of 215 Indigenous children, some as young as three, found at a residential school in Canada that only closed in 1978.  How could that happen? Continue reading

All our organs have clocks

I was listening to Dr. Satchin Panda speaking with Dr. Rhonda Patrick about his book The Circadian Code: Lose Weight, Supercharge Your Energy and Sleep Well Every Night.  So interesting.  He mentioned that as many of us know, our brain has a clock.  This is why we get jet lag when we switch time zones.  But he also mentioned that all our organs have clocks.

When we finish a meal at 6pm, it takes five hours for our digestion organs like the pancreas, liver, and stomach to finish their work and turn off for the night.  However, if we have anything other than water, for example a cup of tea with a half a teaspoon of sugar at 9pm, that five-hour process starts all over again.  Continue reading

Cory Booker

I’ve always admired U.S. Senator Cory Booker and I learned so much from listening into a chat he had with Tim Ferris on The Tim Ferriss Show.  He spoke about his parents coming from poverty and getting the opportunity to go to school.  Then both his parents ended up working at IBM as some of the first Black executives on that team.  When they wanted to buy a home, they learned about real estate steering. Continue reading

The way we live our lives

I was listening to The Tim Ferriss Show and his guest was Ricardo Semler.  He is the former CEO of Semler Partners and he grew his father’s business from making four million in 1982 to 212 million in 2003.  He now has a podcast called Leadwise that challenges what we think about the way we live our lives at home and at work.

When he joined his dad’s company, at age 19, he didn’t understand why they did things they way they did.  He talks about asking three whys and how by the third why, many find they aren’t really sure why it’s done that way at all. Continue reading

David Whyte

I recently came across poet David Whyte.  He has Irish and English roots and a hypnotic voice that draws you in to his poems.  There is a segment in the Waking Up meditation app where he shares some of his work.  He writes words that really cut you open and change the way you see things.  Things you thought you knew seem new again.

In The Bell and the Blackbird, he recalls an old Irish story of a monk standing by the monastary in early morning and hearing the bell ring, calling him to his work of prayer.  The monk thinks this is the most beautiful sound.  He turns to go but then hears the blackbird singing in the forest and he thinks this is the most beautiful sound.  We don’t know what sound the monk chooses to follow, but he represents us all.  Where will we go next on our journey?  We have many compelling options. Continue reading

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